Frequently asked questions

Membership/Association

You can apply for membership by following this link:

APPLY

If you have any questions regarding HANYC membership, please contact Niki Franzitta at [email protected].

If you have forgotten your password please click here and then click on “Forgot your password?”. You will need to enter the email address or username associated with your account to reset your password.

To create an account and access our member documents please click here:

REGISTER

 

We at the Hotel Association of New York City do not handle any pension benefits. To find out what you are entitled to please contact 212-586-6400 ext. 4125.

Operation and Taxes in New York City

If you are staying at a New York City hotel your taxes will be:

  • New York State Sales Tax for Hotels: 4%
  • New York City Sales Tax for Hotels: 4.5%
  • MCTD (Metropolitan Commuter Transportation District) sales & use tax – 0.375%
  • NYC Hotel Room Occupancy Tax Rate – $2 per room + 5.875%
  • New York State Hotel Unit Fee (aka Javits Center fee) – $1.50 per unit per day

It will end up being a little less than 15% + $3.50 per day.

New York City hotel operators are required to charge a number of taxes and fees, which make local hospitality regulations more complex than others leveled throughout the United States.

Charges include:

  • NYC hotel room occupancy tax of 5.875%;
  • NYC hotel room occupancy fee of $2/room for rooms priced at $40 or more;
  • New York State hotel unit fee of $1.50/day, which is reported and remitted on the quarterly sales tax returns
  • New York State Sales Tax 4% 

We suggest that you contact the manager of the property you booked with and explain your experience and expectations in detail. We at the Hotel Association of New York City do not handle complaints against any hotels.

Yes, it is mandatory to display Hotel Public Rates.

The minimum age requirement to book and stay in New York City is 18 years old, with proof of identification.

Short-Term Rentals in New York City

In New York City a Short-Term Rental refers to renting for any period shorter than 30 days. There are rules, laws and consequences governing short-term rentals that are enforceable today.

In New York City an illegal hotel refers to an entire apartment or home rented to visitors on a transient basis i.e. for less than 30 days. However, an apartment owner/renter (subject to their building restrictions and laws) can have up to two paying guests for less than 30 days provided each such guest has unobstructed access to every room and to each exit within the apartment and the right to use at least one bathroom. In addition, the legal occupant of the apartment must be present during the guests’ stay if it is for less than 30 days; and no key locks may be installed on any internal door as all occupants in the premises need to maintain a common household.

Please note that New York State law also prohibits the advertising of an apartment in a Class A multiple dwelling (generally, a building with three or more permanent residential units) for rent for any period less than 30 days. Fines for doing so range from $1,000 to $7,500 and will be issued to the person who posts the advertisement. Visitors looking to submit a complaint regarding an illegal hotel may either call 311 or click on the following link.

 

The cost of your short-term rental or hotel room will depend largely on the location and the time of year. On the surface, booking a short-term rental may appear to be less expensive. However, when taxes and cleaning service fees are included typically you will be looking at just about the same amount for booking a hotel. Hotels provide easier check-ins, concierge, security and lastly what you see is what you usually get when booking a hotel room.

Getting Around New York City

There are a number of ways to get around New York City. Not to mention apps that make doing so a lot easier.

The MTA Subway is one of the quickest ways to get around New York City here are some tips on how to ride the Subway.

KickMap

This subway map is a simple, scrollable and zoomable guide for all subway lines, connections, and stops. The best thing about this map is that is works underground requiring no internet service.

MTA Subway Time

Track your train with this app, which provides live, up-to-date schedules for a number of train lines.

Transit

This app provides you with schedule information based on the closest transit options near you; it includes everything from the bus to the subway to the PATH train and Uber availability. This app can also be used in other participating US cities like Los Angeles, Boston and Washington DC. 

Weekender
The Weekender app is your go-to guide to getting around NYC when construction alters your weekend subway service. The app displays all service changes so riders can plan accordingly.